Steve Jobs

9 Books to Read this Summer

Food for Thought
Animal Farm
Atlas Shrugged
Brave New World

Nonfictional works that read like extraordinary fiction
The Age of Wonder
The Lost Boy
The Moral Judgment of the Child
Night
The Rape of Nanking (warning: very disturbing)
Steve Jobs

Do you have book recommendations for us? We love to curl up to a good book!

Book Review: Steve Jobs

Title: Steve Jobs
Author: Walter Isaacson
Genre: Biography
Length: 656 pages

About
Jobs agreed to have a biography written about him so he could inform his children of why he was such an absent father. For a man who was extremely sensitive about his image, the project also assured him that his biography would be truthful. Indeed, he and his family urged for truth – for a portrayal that reflected the dichotomies that existed in him. He was cruel, yet brilliant. He was visionary, but also hypocritical. He viewed himself as an artist and allowed the stereotypical temperaments of an artist to manifest. To the world, Jobs was an astonishing individual who provided a perfect case study for business schools, technologists, and inventors.

He Said
Steve Jobs is one of the most iconic figures of the 20th & 21st centuries. Whether you love or hate Apple, Jobs most likely influenced your life in one way or another. Jobs does an impeccable job at detailing, without filters or biases, the fascinating “true story” behind all of the technological advancements and how Apple became one of the most valuable companies in the world. I really enjoyed learning about how the iPod, iPhone, and iPad came to be. The chapters on Pixar were a surprising bonus as I didn’t know Jobs had such an involvement in my favorite animated production studio. The biography was well-written and structured and shows the culmination of lots of research.

She Said
Uncensored. Poignant. The book painted a clear image of Jobs as a selfish jerk and… an innovative genius. Jobs left behind a legacy of not just a revolutionized digital world that meets both the demands of art and technology, but also a proven science of a “great company”. He built Apple (and Pixar) on a collaborative and cutting-edge platform that won’t settle for less than best. As a person, Jobs left lots to be desired. He seemingly had no social filter and would speak his mind even to hurt people at will. Indeed, the book contained many details that would delight Pixar and Apple fans.

We Say
When it comes to Jobs, he commands “the best”; therefore it is not surprising that he chose Isaacson to compose his biography. Isaacson wrote a truly candid, insightful, and detailed piece that does its best to present the multifaceted sides of Jobs and his intelligence, which led to so many innovations. A must-read for anyone with a curiosity towards the man responsible for Apple and Pixar. It allows the reader to see Jobs as a person, exposing his genius and flaws.